Saturday, January 26, 2008

Musing the Commute

I have never (repeat never) lived and worked in the same city. My commute to work (for 20 years) has included a drive of 30 minutes to 60 minutes each way. Currently (and for the last 8 years), my drive has been 30 minutes each way.

I am convinced that God has done this to allow me to worship, pray, listen and meditate. The two places I most often "hear" God are during my commute and during the mundane practice of brushing my teeth (yeah. go figure).

Anyway. I used to listen exclusively to Christian worship CDs. Very good way to begin the day.

Of late, I have (apparently) been feeling a bit nostalgic and motivated by the rick-bottom pricing of CDs from artists of my youth, I have been listening to a sprinkling of ::ahem:: "oldies".

Currently, in my stylin' mini-van, I have the following collection of music: John Denver, The Cars, Styx, Queen, Willie Nelson, 38 Special, Garth Brooks, 80's Party Starter, Loverboy, Michael Jackson, Simon and Garfunkle, Bryan Adams, Stevie Wonder, Elton John, Jackson Brown---all Greatest Hits; Bruce Springsteen (The Rising).

Aaannnnnd I have: Barlow Girl, O Brother Where Art Thou soundtrack, WOW Worship, Nicole C. Mullen, Jason Upton-Faith; Misty Edwards, Mark Lowry-Twenty Stories Tall, Michael Card-The Promise; Vineyard-My Redeemer Lives; Worship Together, Petra-Praise.

What I have noticed is that...music that I listened to in my youth (prior to becoming a Christian at age 30) at first, makes me a bit uncomfortable (I can remember where I was and who I was with and oh dear--what we were *doing*), but then, the music (most of it) morphs into something that fits where I am at today (and for the last 15 years).

The secular becomes the sacred. Yup. It's true. Most music (for me) now has sacred undertones. God, for me, *is* everywhere. Even in my mis-spent, mis-guided youth.

Ahhh...Redemption.


(fyi-i linked the Christian artists, as i felt they were probably less well-known. pretty sure y'all know who michael jackson is lol)

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